Holiday Greetings From Rush

Rush_HolidayCard_500

The following is excerpted from Rush’s annual holiday greeting:

Within our busy environment, we strive to create a calming feeling for our patients and ourselves.

There are a number of new spaces within the Tower that offer opportunities for quiet reflection. They include the fourth floor quiet area and the Tower’s rooftop gardens, including the area shown here. In addition, a new space for spiritual reflection and quiet meditation will be opening next year on the Atrium fourth floor.

These areas are an important part of the healing environment we have created in the Medical Center, providing patients, family members and the people who work at Rush with places where they can calm themselves, make plans, and draw on their faith and their inner strength to meet the challenges ahead of them.

We wish you and your family a joyous holiday season and the very best for the New Year.

— Dr. and Mrs. Larry Goodman

Larry Goodman, MD, is CEO of Rush University Medical Center. Photo by Steve Gadomski, Rush Photo Group.

Tradition, Transformation and Giving Thanks

By Brad Hinrichs

Thanksgiving Day is a distant memory by now, but one of the best traditions of that holiday comes to mind and seems particularly appropriate to me now. That tradition is to reminisce about what we are particularly grateful for, and as the name of the holiday literally implies, to engage in some “thanks giving” as a result. So let me take a minute to do just that.

I am grateful for the thousands of colleagues at Rush University Medical Center whose commitment to “the patient comes first” seems as strong to me as it did 40 years ago, when I recall that same message being delivered by then-president Dr. James A. Campbell in my new employee orientation session. This guiding principle has been key in making Rush the outstanding patient care organization that it is and has made being affiliated with it for so long such a privilege. Thanks to each and every one of you.

Continue reading

Panorama in the Pavilion


Nearly 1,400 pieces of art can be found throughout the Rush’s new hospital, some of them donated, others created by local artists.

One of the Tower’s centerpieces is the 30- by 20-foot view of the Chicago skyline in the Edward A. Brennan Entry Pavilion, designed by H. Marion Art Consultants and photographed Steve Gadomski from the Rush Photo Group. It’s made up of 63 different photos and features the Tower in the foreground.

Here’s a video showing time-lapse photos of the 30-hour installation.

Related posts:

Holiday Greetings from Rush


By Kim Sareny

This year’s holiday card celebrates a historic moment at Rush by featuring a dramatic shot of Rush’s new hospital set against Chicago and the skyline looking east. The words featured on the front say exactly what many of us close to Rush have been feeling … joy, pride, excitement and anticipation.

Truly, Rush employees, patients and Chicago’s surrounding community have been watching and waiting anxiously for this moment — to move into “the future of medicine” here at Rush.

So what image could possibly capture the emotion we have all been feeling? Well, last month, in an effort to continue to share what’s great about Rush’s new Tower, Rush’s marketing department had photos taken from a helicopter for our upcoming ad campaign. The chosen photo from that shoot used for the card presents a unique perspective of Rush’s impressive facility. While the shot is very real, a few “enhancements” were made to the sky to give it a magical quality — fitting for the holidays and for a patient care tower that can give so much to so many people.

Kimberly Sareny is director of graphic design at Rush University Medical Center.

Rush’s New Hospital: Gearing Up For The Big Move

Cynthia (Cindee) Castronovo at a recent shoot for an ad about Rush's new hospital.

By Cynthia Castronovo

After spending over five years working closely with the Office of Transformation team as it helped design and build Rush’s new hospital, it recently occurred to me that my role has shifted as we get ready to open it. My communication efforts have changed from tracking the building’s progress and celebrating its milestones, to preparing employees to move into the Tower in January.

Now, instead of sitting in meetings with architects and construction workers, I am working with the operational people who will be moving into this beautiful new building. I now sit on a number of committees and have a whole new appreciation for the synergies that take place when you have the right people in a room — all working with a common goal. Continue reading