Rush Provost: Embracing Change Over Four Decades

deutsch

Thomas Deutsch, MD, with his father and daughter.

By Thomas Deutsch, MD

In many ways I’ve spent my entire life in the Rush family. My grandfather was a physician who practiced at the old St. Luke’s Hospital, my father was a Rush physician for over 50 years, and I’ve been here most of the past 40. My daughter is a recent graduate of Rush Medical College and has begun her residency at Rush. She will be the fourth generation Rush ophthalmologist! The Deutsch family is extremely proud to be part of the Rush family.

I came to Rush in 1975 as a medical student, and since then my roles have changed a number of times. After medical school, I spent one year as an intern, and then returned four years later in charge of the medical student and residency education programs in the department of ophthalmology. As the “program director” for 12 years and then chair of the department for an additional eight years, we were able to develop the largest and most comprehensive academic department of ophthalmology in Chicago.

Continue reading

Join Rush in Celebrating Our Community Engagement

community-service-fbBy Marilyn Wideman

Rush University Medical Center is well-known in our community, but our community engagement remains one of Rush’s best-known secrets. To recognize and celebrate this work, Rush is hosting our inaugural Community Health Improvement Week.

All members of the public are welcome to join us between May 4 and 7 for a series of panel discussions, poster presentations and a keynote and awards session. You can register to attend the events here.

While Rush cares for patients from throughout the Chicago area, and even throughout the world, the main communities we serve are our neighbors on Chicago’s West Side, where Rush chose to remain even after other hospitals left during social unrest in the 1960s. This community includes the East and West Garfield Park, North and South Lawndale, and West Side and Lower West Side and West Town neighborhoods.

These are neighborhoods that struggle with high rates of poverty, crime, and the disparities in health that accompany them. Working amid these neighborhoods ensures that we at Rush see these problems, and our community engagement has developed in response to them.

Continue reading

From the Archives: James B. Herrick, MD

HerrickClinic

This photo from the Rush Archives shows a clinic in 1900 featuring James B. Herrick, MD, a Rush Medical College graduate and faculty member who discovered sickle cell anemia.

Ernest E. Irons (Rush class of 1903), the intern who first brought the abnormal cells to Herrick’s attention, later became dean of Rush Medical College.

Rush Medical College and the Great Chicago Fire

RMCFire1871

Rush Medical College opened a new building at Dearborn Street and Grand Avenue in 1867 to accommodate its growing student population, only to see it destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire. Faculty members and students stand amid the ruins in this 1871 photo.

Hoping to avoid another disastrous fire, Rush Medical College moved in 1875 to the corner of Wood and Harrison streets, on the edge of what’s now the Rush University Medical Center campus.

View more historic photos from the Rush Archives.

Veteran, Rush Faculty Member: ‘What is My Identity?’

Photo by Jason Chiou, Rush Photo Group

Photo by Jason Chiou, Rush Photo Group

By Tanya Friese

What is your identity? Identity is a multifaceted concept rooted in culture, religion, sexual orientation, profession, personal philosophy, social roles in society and many other forces driven by nature and environment. There is no right or wrong answer. How I define myself may change over time and may be different than how others perceive me.

I am a faculty member at Rush University College of Nursing. I teach public health, community-based mental health, epidemiology and biostatistics and conduct research to improve the quality of life for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities. I am also a retired noncommissioned officer of the United States Navy, a hospital corpsman, and a 100 percent disabled Gulf War veteran. So what is my identity?

Many of us (current and former service members) are still trying to figure this out. I am fortunate to have the support of Rush College of Nursing and Rush University Medical Center embrace me holistically as the complex human I am.

Continue reading

Helping People Breathe

EmileeLamorena_Schweitzer25By Emilee Lamorena

On Feb. 17, 2010, while I was teaching high school science in the Bronx, my mother was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. I quickly left everything — my teaching fellowship, my master’s degree program and my friends — and returned to Chicago to be with my family and my mom.

I always knew I was going to work in health care, but I wasn’t sure which route or specialty I was really interested in. While I saw my mother suffering, I came to a very big realization: There is nothing in the world harder than watching someone you love struggle for a breath. It was the most helpless feeling to not be able to alleviate any of that hardship.

After caring for her through her illness (my mother passed away about 10 months after she was diagnosed), I knew that I wanted to dedicate my life to helping people breathe and supporting their loved ones. In 2011, I entered the Master of Science in Respiratory Care Program at Rush, where my mother received wonderful care, so I could help people care for their heart and lungs.

Continue reading

M1: An Interview With Rush CEO Larry Goodman, MD

First-year Rush Medical College student Joe Santamaria met up recently with Rush University Medical Center CEO Larry Goodman, MD, for a conversation in the Brennan Entry Pavilion. In the interview, Goodman reflects on his time in medical school and the career path to hospital leadership.

“I never would have thought I would be doing anything other than practicing my entire career,” he says.