Eat Well: Broiled Tilapia With Pineapple Relish

This is the first in a series of healthy recipes from Jennifer Ventrelle, MS, RD, CPT, director of lifestyle programs for the Rush University Prevention Center.

Tilapia is a low-fat, low-carb and low-sodium quality protein source. It is also an excellent source of potassium, B-vitamins such as B12 and niacin, and the antioxidant selenium. And the pineapple relish in this recipe is a great way to bring refreshing variety to an otherwise boring fish filet. The tilapia can be replaced with another type of lean protein such as chicken or pork tenderloin if you are not fond of fish.

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 4 (4-ounce) tilapia fillets
  • 1 ¼ cups pineapple tidbits canned in natural juice
  • ¼ cup chopped onion
  • ¼ cup chopped plum tomato
  • 1 ½ tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 lime wedges

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Running Injuries Rise With Marathon Training Mileage

Join Joshua Blomgren, DO, for tips on running injury prevention and treatment during an online chat from noon to 1 p.m. on July 25. Visit our Rush Facebook page to sign up for a reminder and view the chat.

By Joshua Blomgren, DO

As the temperatures rise in Chicago, I also see a rise in the number of running injuries that present to my office. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon hosts over 40,000 runners, many from Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, for the annual event that takes place in October.

Many runners see a large increase in their mileage as they begin to progress in their training programs, and most training plans for an October marathon will have the runners begin to progress to 10 miles and beyond around this time of year. It’s not uncommon for a patient to say things such as, “I did my long run this weekend and …” or “I did 10 miles last weekend, and this is the farthest I have ever run.” Often these long runs are met with aches and pain as the runners push toward their goal of completing 26.2 miles.

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Is Running a Marathon Good For You?

Third in a series of posts recognizing American Heart Month

By Kousik Krishnan, MD

Over the past several years, in very high-profile, large-city marathons, there have occasionally been deaths during races. They have occurred during the Chicago Marathon, the Philadelphia Marathon and even the Olympic Marathon Trials in 2007. These reports often bring to light an unusual paradox, where seemingly very healthy individuals are dying during athletic pursuits, when these same individuals are ostensibly healthy enough to go through the rigors of training for years without any incident.

Why are these individuals dying? Are they living with an undiagnosed condition that leads to the tragic result? Shouldn’t this condition have warning signs or symptoms? Is there something unique about the actual race that triggers an event that doesn’t become evident during normal training?

In the past, I have written about screening for heart disease prior to beginning a vigorous training program. (Read more about symptoms and risk factors that should prompt physician evaluation.)

With this background, I was very interested in a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine that analyzed the Race Associated Cardiac Arrest Event Registry (RACER). This registry collected data from the most recent decade of long-distance running races to determine the incidence, clinical profile, and outcomes of cardiac arrest in these events. The finding of this study show that the rate of cardiac arrest is actually very low (1 per 184,000 runners) and lower than cardiac arrest rates for college athletes, triathletes and previously healthy middle-aged joggers.

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