Endurance Athlete Back in Action After Hip Surgery

matt-aaronsonBy Matt Aaronson

I had never been physically active prior to 2010. In fact, at one point I weighed more than 200 pounds. But with three kids at home, I needed to make some serious changes in my lifestyle and get healthy for myself and my family. 

So I started to run for fitness. I was fortunate and began losing a lot of weight. And as I lost weight, I became a faster runner. I signed up for some races and noticed that I was commonly in the top 10 or even in the top three. I got into triathlons to try something different and realized my results were excellent. I even qualified for the World Championships in 2011, in my first half Ironman.

I ran my first marathon in 2013 in under three hours, during which I qualified for the Boston Marathon. However, while I was training for the Boston Marathon my hip started really bothering me. I thought I would be fine if I just ran a little bit less. Initially for my training I was up to 60 miles a week. But once I injured my hip, I went back down to less than 30 miles a week, even in the mid-20s per week. But the pain still got worse and worse.

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Clinical Trials Provide Hope, Opportunity


Crista Brawley (left) with Margaret Cooper

By Crista Brawley

People don’t always realize that clinical research trials are very interactive, and there’s a lot of individual patient care that goes on with clinical research as well. You need someone that’s willing to share with you all the details of how their body is responding to help us understand the up and downsides of what they’re going through. It’s a very personal experience.

When Margaret Cooper came to Rush for a second opinion on her metastatic breast cancer, the team let her know there were many options to manage her cancer, including ones in clinical research. We asked if she would be willing to learn about some of these studies we had to offer.

Margaret was excited about being in a clinical trial, and that enthusiasm is great for us as a team. Margaret wanted to closely follow the protocol, listen and learn about her care.

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Margaret’s Story: Second Opinion, ‘Second Chance’

margaret-cooperBy Margaret Cooper

In 2009, I was diagnosed with breast cancer in my left breast and in some of the lymph nodes on the left side. I had a successful surgery and treatment with chemotherapy followed by reconstructive surgery. They removed 12 lymph nodes, and I had radiation. Everything was going well.

As I approached the five-year mark that would have given me a clean bill of health, I started not feeling well. I had a lot of pain in my upper back, and I felt a lump under my right arm. But my dad was dying at the time, and I was at the hospital a lot. I thought it was just fatigue.

When I went to the doctor, I was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in my bones. It was very, very aggressive. I went to the same hospital near my home where I’d received my first round of treatment. The doctor there told me that there was nothing they could do. That it was hopeless, and I only had a short time left to live.

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Fashion Forward: Ninety Years of Supporting Rush

For the past 90 years, the Woman’s Board of Rush University Medical Center has produced the longest continuously running charitable fashion show in the country. The Woman’s Board Fashion Show was described by Chicago magazine as a “being a philanthropic force” that serves as “a barometer of Chicago’s ever-changing fashion scene.”

Starting in 1926 with a benefit show for St. Luke’s Hospital, the fashion show continued as St. Luke’s merged with Presbyterian Hospital and then with Rush. The show has raised more than $32.6 million since it began keeping records of all fundraising efforts in 1974.

Here’s a sampling of Woman’s Board Fashion Show posters and program covers dating back to the 1920s, courtesy of the Rush Archives.

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In 2016, the Woman’s Board Fashion Show will support the Center for Veterans and Their Families at Rush, an innovative effort that connects veterans and their families with specialized mental health care, peer-to-peer outreach, counseling and resources they need to transition from military to civilian life.

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Obamacare: More Success Than Failure So Far

peter-butlerBy Peter W. Butler, MHSA

More than six years after it was signed into law, the Affordable Care Act continues to arouse strong opinions and strong objections. Consider, for instance, the viewpoint made clear by the title of a Sept.11 Chicago Tribune editorial, “Why Obamacare Failed.”

Simply dismissing the ACA as a “failure,” however, is not supported by the facts when considered in the context of what Obamacare, as the ACA is more widely known, set out to accomplish. According to the obamacarefacts.com website, the goal of the Affordable Care Act is to “give more Americans access to affordable, quality health insurance and to reduce the growth in U.S. health care spending.”

Although some of the editorial made valid points about problems with state health insurance exchanges (marketplaces), especially in Illinois, the exchanges are a small part of Obamacare. The Tribune editorial board appears to have reached its conclusions based on premium increases and the limited number of choices available on the state exchanges.

How the ACA has helped

This view ignores a wide array of peer-reviewed data that examines the full impact of the ACA. These data and evaluations present a health care system that is performing much better than it was prior to the enactment of the ACA.

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Alzheimer’s Risks, and How You Can Protect Yourself

alzheimersBy Neelum T. Aggarwal, MD

The passing of the actor Gene Wilder — remembered by many for his lovable portrayal of Willy Wonka — further reinforced that fact that Alzheimer’s disease does not spare anyone. Many people were no doubt surprised to hear about his diagnosis and that he died from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. After all, Gene Wilder was wildly talented, engaged in creative activities all of his life, appeared physically spry and had a wonderful imagination. How could this happen to him?

Indeed, Alzheimer’s disease dementia can happen to anyone, and crosses race/ethnicity and social economic status. More than 5.5 million people in the United States officially have Alzheimer’s disease dementia, which is an underestimation, as many people live with the disease never receive a diagnosis.

Minorities, African-Americans and Latinos are appearing to be hit harder with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. African-Americans are at least 1.5 times more likely to develop the disease, and the data suggests the same for Latinos. Recent data is also confirming that sex and gender differences are present in Alzheimer’s disease — women are developing  the disease more than men.

Lifestyle factors that may increase Alzheimer’s risk

Comorbid medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, nutritional deficiencies and depression all can lead to poor cognitive function and can be risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease. People with a history of hypertension also may have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease dementia and other dementias. In addition, people who have decreased heart function are two to three times more likely to develop significant memory loss compared to those with better heart function. Lastly, those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors were more likely to have impairment in learning, memory and verbal fluency tests and worsened over time.

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‘Smart Screening’ for Prostate Cancer

leslie-deaneBy Leslie Deane, MD

As a young boy growing up, I saw two of my grandfather’s brothers be diagnosed with prostate cancer and develop metastases from it, and ultimately succumb to this disease. This was in the pre-prostate specific antigen (PSA) era. This was at a time when men were still treated with diethylstilbestrol, and treatments for advanced prostate cancer were not available. Had screening been an option at that time, they may have been diagnosed earlier and possibly not suffer the way they did.

PSA is an enzyme that is present in prostatic tissue, and its level in the blood can be measured by simple blood test. It is used to estimate a man’s chances of having prostate cancer based on its level.

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